UPS identity will deliver to the parcel-buying public

I read with interest the comments in Design Week regarding the new UPS logo (Letters, DW 17 April). While I sympathise and, indeed, agree with most of what was said, I can’t help thinking that UPS customers did not enter their field of vision while they w

I read with interest the comments in Design Week regarding the new UPS logo (Letters, DW 17 April).

While I sympathise and, indeed, agree with most of what was said, I can’t help thinking that UPS customers did not enter their field of vision while they were busy defending an institution. There would be few members of the public who would either recognise the merits of the former logo or know its origins.

The new logo, however superficial the result, reflects trends that a modern audience will recognise and relate to. It also reflects the fact that UPS wants to be seen to have taken a step forward in the way it addresses its customers and is prepared to risk losing a part of its history to achieve this objective.

We now live in a world where change is expected and image is everything. It’s a shame that we all believe the new UPS logo will have nowhere near the life expectancy of the original, however, I think it suits today’s needs perfectly.

Peter Smith

Managing director

Red Square

Worcs B96 6JY

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