BA tailfins were too much of a visual leap

I read the article Identity crisis at BA by David Bernstein (DW 30 July) with amazement due to the irony it projected. BA’s new visual identity obviously signals a strategic shift in its positioning.

I read the article Identity crisis at BA by David Bernstein (DW 30 July) with amazement due to the irony it projected. BA’s new visual identity obviously signals a strategic shift in its positioning. Undoubtedly, this is spurred on by the changes in the air travel industry where alliances are constantly being redefined to achieve a better global network. This aggressive pioneering move by BA to establish itself as a global leader is commendable. Interbrand Newell and Sorrell’s visual system to communicate this pursuit is innovative and challenges the traditions of corporate identity. To a beholder who is numbed by the obligatory national flag on the tailfins, an ethnic design could be too much of a visual leap. Perhaps this balance is too advanced for such viewers. However, if you really examine the new designs, the tailfins are a secondary element, supporting the primary logotype with the “swoosh” ribbon in the red and blue of the national colours applied consistently in other areas. Let’s be serious, a livery design does not an identity make. Derek Zee London SW15

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