Fuseproject creates new PayPal identity

Consultancy Fuseproject has created a new identity for payment service PayPal.

The new look has been designed to reflect the range of platforms that PayPal can now be accessed on and the newer services it now offers.

PayPal, which was launched in 1999, says its old logo was ‘designed for the online world’ and that the service is now used by customers on tablets and phones. It can also be accessed via an app that allows payment in store and gives users the capability to send money between friends by using a mobile number.

Alison Sagar, UK marketing director at PayPal, says product innovation has prompted the rebrand.

She says, ‘There are 58 new products. Innovation is at the heart of the business and with a number of these experiences being rolled out globally this year it makes sense to refresh our brand at the same time.’

The new identity contains four elements; a new wordmark and typefaces, a new monogram of PayPal’s double PP’s, a new dark and light blue colourway and a ‘dynamic angle graphic’.

The wordmark and monogram lock up to form PayPal’s new signature and the company hopes it will evoke ‘trust, innovation, simplicity and youthfulness’ with the new look.

PayPal identity designed by Fuse Project

PayPal, which has 143,000,000 active accounts, says, ‘The design brings together PayPal’s online and mobile imagery in a single brand identity that is more flexible for devices from small wearable screens and mobile devices all the way up to 72” flat screen TVs.’

Campaign by Havas Worldwide
Campaign by Havas Worldwide

The identity precedes a global ad campaign created by Havas Worldwide which is based around a ‘people first’ positioning and features a hand-drawn illustrative style.

It will roll out in the UK on 2 May and features people ‘looking for ways to take advantage of technology and make it simpler,’ PayPal says.

Campaign by Havas Worldwide
Campaign by Havas Worldwide

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