Poke creates Diesel ‘fit your attitude’ jeans website

Poke has designed a new website for jeans brand Diesel’s new ‘fit your attitude’ range of women’s jeans.

Diesel jeans
Diesel jeans

The consultancy was appointed to the project by Diesel following a  creative pitch in October last year, having been invited off the back of work for retail work for Diesel UK.

The range includes six different ‘attitudes’ of jeans – such as spontaneous, sexy and relaxed – according to the type of jeans and the way the wearer feels at a particular occasion. Poke has given each attitude a different typographic treatment for the site.

Oliver Wright, Poke client lead on the project, says, ‘The jeans are a lot more elegant and upmarket than some of the previous lines, so the site design we went for was very clean and elegant. We have the professional photography from the catalogue shoots so there’s a nice clean, grey background and we worked with that.’

The site uses social networking technology Smech to pull on tweets or instagram photographs from seven cites aroud the world – New York, Tokyo, Paris, Milan, London, Shanghai and Mumbai – and displays ‘leaderboards’ of which city is feeling which attitude the most at any given time.

The results of these leaderboards are then used to generate social media conversations and try to instigate ‘communities competing against one another’, according to Wright.

Wright says, ‘It’s a really exiting idea that there are six very tightly defined attitudes and we’re able to show the attitudes of real people at any given moment looking for which pair of jeans to wear. There’s a lightbox full of highlights and that’s surrounded by cool, contagious carefree social content.’

The site launches tomorrow.

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  • Neil Carpenter November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

    Would it not have been better to wait until tomorrow to publish this and actually post a link to the site?

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