Revealing the Invisible

Solar radiometers and invisible datasets are not your average design tools but Luke Jerram’s exhibition at The National Centre for Craft and Design, Revealing the Invisible, collides science with design in a series of sculptures, installations and live art projects. 

SARS Corona Virus
SARS Corona Virus

Solar radiometers and invisible datasets are not your average design tools but Luke Jerram’s exhibition at The National Centre for Craft and Design, Revealing the Invisible, collides science with design in a series of sculptures, installations and live art projects.   

The exhibition features three major collections of Jerram’s work: Data Sculptures, Glass Microbiology and Radiometer Chandeliers. Each uses design to take a look at the phenomena beyond the reach of the naked eye, such as bacteria cells and the power of light.

Chandelier
Chandelier

Jerram created glass objects out of data by translating statistics which have particularly  turbulent rhythms, such as the Japanese earthquake in 2011 or the breakneck speed of trading activity at the New York stock exchange, into three-dimensional structures.

Rotated data sculpture based on Tohoku Japanese Earthquake
Rotated data sculpture based on Tohoku Japanese Earthquake

In Glass Microbiology, Jerram uses sculpture to explore the viruses and bacteria which are responsible for some of the world’s most devastating diseases. He collaborated with virologists from the University of Bristol and specialist glassblowers to construct transparent recreations of HIV, H1N1 (swine flu) and SARS. Besides the fact that Jerram is colourblind, he wanted his microbiological sculptures to be colourless to offer an alternative to the artificially coloured images presented in the media.

SARS Corona Virus
SARS Corona Virus

His multi-tiered chandeliers are designed to reveal the invisible power and beauty of light. Using solar radiometers to convert the heat of light into movement, the chandeliers flicker to resemble giant towers of dancing glass. 

Revealing the Invisible runs from 2 February – 14 April 2013 at The National Centre for Craft and Design, Carre Street, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34. 

Latest articles