Dalziel & Pow revamps Save the Children stores

Save the Children aims to draw more ‘yummy mummies’ and their offspring into its charity stores with a retail concept designed by Dalziel & Pow.

Save the Children aims to draw more ‘yummy mummies’ and their offspring into its charity stores with a retail concept designed by Dalziel & Pow.

The charity is currently looking for two sites in London to showcase its Magic Attic concept, intended to position the charity shop as a more upmarket offering, says D&P graphic designer Matt Avery.

The layout emphasises new products being sold, rather than second-hand offerings, by placing a cash desk and orange sculptural feature in the middle of the retail space that divides the store in two. ‘New products are displayed in the front section,’ says Avery.

Customers can expect a blue, yellow and pink colour scheme across fixtures and fittings, in keeping with Johnson Banks’ branding for the charity. The stores are distinct from Oxfam’s latest concept store, according to Avery, because of their emphasis on children. Features include games such as a trail for children to follow.

The challenge for D&P was to make the store fun for youngsters, yet highlight the charity’s serious work, says Avery.

D&P was appointed to work on the interiors in September 2007 after taking part in a three-way credentials pitch. Johnson Banks was appointed to refresh the charity’s identity in October 2006. The Magic Attic concept has been on trial in Derby since May.

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