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In the week that Deyan Sudjic takes the helm at the Design Museum, what would you like to see celebrated at the museum as it embarks upon its expansion plans?

In the week that Deyan Sudjic takes the helm at the Design Museum, what would you like to see celebrated at the museum as it embarks upon its expansion plans?

I hope with Deyan Sudjic’s background he’ll shift the focus of the Design Museum from products to the broader context and impact of design on society. In particular, the critical role it has in environments and architecture – creating commercial and everyday spaces we can all relate to.

Simon Threadkell, Design director, Fitch (pictured)

I was a fan of Alice Rawsthorn and thought she did an energetic and positive job. So I’d like her energy levels continued and Deyan Sudjic to lead from the front, celebrating design across the board in a positive manner. Most other UK design institutions need a kick up the backside.

Jonathan Ellery, Founder, Browns

I’d like to see the Design Museum relocated to central London, where there’s more energy and a wider audience. It’s exciting to see someone like Deyan Sudjic at the forefront of this vision. I’m looking forward to a new era. No doubt he’ll promote design in an exciting and fascinating way for both the designer and the public.

Fernando Gutiérrez, The Studio of Fernando Gutiérrez

Although, in recent years, under Alice Rawsthorn’s guidance, I have enjoyed the broad mix of exhibition themes, selfishly and predictably I would like the ‘new’ Design Museum to have a dedicated permanent space for graphics-related shows. Traditionally and understandably, past graphic design exhibitions have always been for mass market audiences. Now give us a space for our own discipline so we can see shows occasionally covered by the small galleries in Hoxton or abroad.

Sean Perkins, Partner, North Design

It’s crazy that art is so celebrated – crowds flock to see it – and design is marginal. Or is it? The tides have been turning. In the past few years, the design of buildings, cars, logos, fashion and furniture have all become more interesting publicly. I think the next stage of popularisation is the creation of a design brat pack, like the Young British Artists of the 1990s. But is being more popular what design needs? I am sure Deyan Sudjic is wondering, ‘Do I want the Design Museum to be a fun palace full of crowds, or a haven of all that is best?’

Quentin Newark, Atelier Works

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